Tag Archives: breed specific

Lake Saint Louis, MO update: Proposed animal ordinance no longer enables breed discrimination

The Lake Saint Louis city clerk sent me a copy of the new Bill 3213, which will replace the city’s current animal ordinance.

We had concerns about the wording of the proposal due to a news report several months ago. The proposed wording would have allowed officials to consider a dog’s breed when determining whether to declare it dangerous.

The proposal has since been revised, and no longer contains this wording. Read the new proposal for Lake Saint Louis: Bill 3213

Thanks to all of the people who contacted Lake Saint Louis officials and asked them to change the wording so that personal feelings and assumptions about a dog’s breed would not be part of the process when declaring a dog “dangerous.”

All alerts for Lake Saint Louis, MO: http://stopbsl.com/?s=lake+saint+louis

Lake Saint Louis, MO: Council to discuss dog ordinance revisions, Jan 17

Update 1/17/12: The city clerk has sent me the proposal. It no longer contains the problematic language that was causing us concern. Thanks to everyone who wrote the city council and asked them to change the language!

Lake Saint Louis, MO, city council will take up revisions to its vicious animal ordinance during the Jan 17 council meeting at 7:00 PM. We have requested, but not yet received, a copy of the proposed revisions, to see if the proposal has changed at all since the first draft.

One of the proposed revisions was to change the wording slightly, so that officials will be able to consider breed when determining whether or not a dog is “dangerous.” The city council had proposed this change: “In reference to dogs, a dog’s breed shall not be considered the only consideration in determining whether or not it is ‘dangerous.’” The change would effectively allow officials to make subjective guesses about a dog’s possible breed as one piece of “evidence” that a dog is dangerous.

I am not sure if this wording was retained in the final version of the proposal, but until I can find out, I’d rather play it safe. The vicious animal ordinance revisions are on the council meeting agenda for Jan 17 at 7:00 PM. Residents and locals are encouraged to attend the meeting and express their opposition to consideration of breed when establishing whether a dog is dangerous.

1. Bill No. 3213 – An ordinance amending the Municipal Code of the City of Lake Saint Louis, Title II: Public Health Safety and Welfare, Chapter 210: Animal Regulations, Article I. Domestic and Dangerous Animals, deleting Article I in its entirety and enacting a new Article I on the same subject.

Express your concerns to Lake Saint Louis officials.
City of Lake Saint Louis, 200 Civic Center Drive, Lake Saint Louis, MO 63367
Phone: (636) 625 1200
mpotter@lakesaintlouis.com; rsidebottom@lakesaintlouis.com;  ldegroodt@lakesaintlouis.com; kschweikert@lakesaintlouis.com; kvennard@lakesaintlouis.com; jpellerito@lakesaintlouis.com; grich@lakesaintlouis.com; pmarkworth@lakesaintlouis.com; ddaniel@lakesaintlouis.com; mforce@lakesaintlouis.com

All alerts for Lake Saint Louis, MO: http://stopbsl.com/?s=lake+saint+louis

Lake Saint Louis, MO: Work session to discuss animal ordinance revisions, Dec 19

Lake Saint Louis, MO, is making revisions to its vicious animal ordinance. One of the proposed revisions is to change the wording slightly, so that officials will be able to consider breed when determining whether or not a dog is “dangerous.”

The city council has proposed this change: “In reference to dogs, a dog’s breed shall not be considered the only consideration in determining whether or not it is ‘dangerous.’” The change would effectively allow officials to make subjective guesses about a dog’s possible breed as one piece of “evidence” that a dog is dangerous.

The vicious animal ordinance revisions, presumably including this one, are on a Work Session Agenda for December 19 at 5:30 PM at City Hall.

Express your concerns to Lake Saint Louis officials.
City of Lake Saint Louis, 200 Civic Center Drive, Lake Saint Louis, MO 63367
Phone: (636) 625 1200
mpotter@lakesaintlouis.com; rsidebottom@lakesaintlouis.com;  ldegroodt@lakesaintlouis.com; kschweikert@lakesaintlouis.com; kvennard@lakesaintlouis.com; jpellerito@lakesaintlouis.com; grich@lakesaintlouis.com; pmarkworth@lakesaintlouis.com; ddaniel@lakesaintlouis.com; mforce@lakesaintlouis.com

All alerts for Lake Saint Louis, MO: http://stopbsl.com/?s=lake+saint+louis

Lake Saint Louis, MO: Breed may be considered when designating “dangerous” dog

Lake Saint Louis, MO, believes its current dangerous dog ordinance is “too soft and unenforceable.”

The ordinance currently defines a dangerous dog as: any animal which, without justification, attacks a person or domestic animal causing physical injury or death or behaves in a manner that a reasonable person would believe poses an unjustified imminent threat of serious injury or death to one (1) or more persons or domestic animals.  In reference to dogs, a dog’s breed shall not be considered in determining whether or not it is “dangerous.”

The city council has proposed changing the last sentence to “In reference to dogs, a dog’s breed shall not be the only consideration in determining whether or not it is ‘dangerous.’” (Another councilmember suggests to replace “shall” with “may.”)

So, how does this change make the ordinance any less “soft and unenforceable”? We’d like to know the answer to that, too.

There are many facts that an animal control officer (ACO) could consider when determining a dangerous dog, such as the dog’s weight, height, sex; whether or not it is neutered; how it has been trained by the owner; whether or not it is being contained; whether or not it is being misused, neglected, or abused; whether or not it has all it shots; whether or not it has a bite history; and so forth.

But to allow an ACO or a judge to make a subjective guess about a dog’s breed, and then to factor in his or her opinions and stereotypes about that breed and the type of people that own it, in order to determine whether or not a dog is dangerous… Does that sound like a fair and enforceable ordinance to you?

Express your concerns to Lake Saint Louis officials.
City of Lake Saint Louis, 200 Civic Center Drive, Lake Saint Louis, MO 63367
Phone:(636) 625 1200
mpotter@lakesaintlouis.com; rsidebottom@lakesaintlouis.com;  ldegroodt@lakesaintlouis.com; kschweikert@lakesaintlouis.com; kvennard@lakesaintlouis.com; jpellerito@lakesaintlouis.com; grich@lakesaintlouis.com; pmarkworth@lakesaintlouis.com; ddaniel@lakesaintlouis.com; mforce@lakesaintlouis.com

Lake Saint Louis city council meets on the 1st and 3rd Monday of each month. Next council meeting: Nov 21.

Board Seeks To ‘Put Some Teeth’ Into Vicious Animal Ordinance

One alderman believes that Lake Saint Louis’ dangerous dog ordinance is “too soft and not enforceable.”

By Tamara Duncan
November 8, 2011

[...] Alderman Karen Vennard expressed concern about how a dog’s breed would be taken into consideration in evaluating a dangerous dog.

[Police Chief Mike] Force said that the wording about the breed of dog would be changed. “We changed it from ‘shall not be considered’ to ‘shall not be the only consideration’,” he said. [...]

Vennard also expressed her concerns about enforcement. “Is this truly going to solve the issue? How do we enforce this short of getting a dog catcher?” [...]

The board agreed to refer the proposed ordinance to the prosecutor for advice about the wording.

Full article retrieved 11/9/11 from http://lakesaintlouis.patch.com/articles/board-seeks-to-put-some-teeth-into-vicious-animal-ordinance

New York City: Pit bulls at shelters surge after NYCHA restrictions

Previous alerts and info about the NYCHA restrictions: http://stopbsl.com/?s=nycha

Tossed into the cold: Pit bulls at shelters surge after NYCHA restrictions

BY Amy Sacks
DAILY NEWS WRITER
Saturday, January 9th 2010, 4:00 AM

For most of his short life, Chase was able to enjoy the creature comforts of a safe, cozy home.

But for the last three weeks, the 2-year-old waggy-tailed, face-licking pup has instead been locked up in a steel cage at a noisy Manhattan shelter.

He is among the 171 unfortunate dogs surrendered to city shelters by their owners since April, after the New York City Housing Authority reduced the weight limit from 40 to 25 pounds and restricted specific breeds, including Pit bulls, Rottweilers and Dobermans, either pure or mixed.

“Chase could not be friendlier, but he is condemned not for his character but for his weight and breed,” said Kevan Cleary[...]

Full article retrieved on 2/3/10 from http://www.nydailynews.com/lifestyle/pets/2010/01/09/2010-01-09_tossed_into_the_cold_pit_bulls_at_shelters_surge_after_nycha_restrictions.html

Charlotte, NC: Pit Bulls Taken To Charlotte Shelter Costing Taxpayers

Breed-specific no-adopt policy in the Charlotte shelter results in a lot of innocent dead dogs at a high expense to taxpayers.

Animal Care and Control would like to hear opinions from the public about their breed-specific no-adopt policy:
8315 Byrum Drive
Charlotte, NC 28217
Phone-Local……………..311
Out of County- 704-336-7600

City Council would need to vote to change the shelter’s policy. Contact them through this handy online form:
http://www.charmeck.org/Departments/City+Council/Forms/home.htm

Charlotte itself does not have breed-specific legislation.

9 Investigates: Pit Bulls Taken To Charlotte Shelter Costing Taxpayers

Posted: 3:50 pm EST November 13, 2009
Updated: 6:34 pm EST November 13, 2009

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — About 2,500 pit bulls come through pit bull row at Charlotte-Mecklenburg Animal Care and Control each year.

[... Shelter spokeswoman Melissa Knicely] said that poses a special challenge at Charlotte’s facility because pit bulls can’t be adopted out.[...]

To change the policy about not adopting out pit bulls, the department would need city council approval and extra staff. But before it even got that far, they’d want to hear from the public because they realize some people might be very opposed.

Full article retrieved 11/15/09 from http://www.wsoctv.com/news/21608988/detail.html

Lubbock, TX: Residents urge tougher dog laws after horses killed

Texas state law prohibits BSL, so Lubbock cannot consider BSL an option.

Residents urge tougher dog laws after horses killed

By Robin Pyle | AVALANCHE-JOURNAL
Friday, November 13, 2009
Story last updated at 11/13/2009 – 10:15 am

[...] The council did recently pass an ordinance to address loose dogs.

The ordinance will require all pets be spayed or neutered if authorities catch them loose on two occasions, said Quincy White, assistant city manager.

[...] Meanwhile, animal control officers have been trying to increase response times to animal calls and are setting large traps to catch more loose dogs.

And Byrd said officials have been more aggressive in pursuing dangerous-animal hearings – there are generally two to three a month.[...]

Full article retrieved 11/13/09 from http://lubbockonline.com/stories/111309/loc_515862312.shtml