Tag Archives: pitt bull

Chesterfield, MO – Repeals Pit Bull Legislation

***UDATE***

Chesterfield, Missouri! Bill No. 2909, which amends the “Dangerous Animals” ordinance to REMOVE all the breed specific language was APPROVED at the second reading on December 3rd, 2012!

Way to go Chesterfield!

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Chesterfield, Missouri Council members will meet at 7:00 PM tonight, Monday, December 3rd to move forward with removal of the cities current breed specific legislation REPEAL.

If you are in the area, please attend the meeting in effort to show your support of this action.

For more information….

Schuyler, Nebraska – MULTI-Breed Restrictions Considered

On Tuesday, December 4, 2012, the Schuyler, Nebraska city council will hold the second reading of a proposed dangerous dog ordinance that targets several breeds of dogs including:

American pit bull terrier,
American Staffordshire terrier,
Staffordshire bull terrier,
Dogo Argentina,
Presa Canario,
Cane Corso,
American bulldog,
Chow chow,
Doberman,
Rottweiler;
and American bandagge.

Read more from Bless the Bullys….

Manly, Iowa – Repeal of Pit Bull Ban Possible

Officials in the city of Many, Iowa discussed the possibility of repealing the city’s  ordinance bannine pit bulls at last night’s city council meeting.  The city adopted its breed specific ordinance in 2008, but the ordinance has not been enforced.  However, several residents recently received a letter from the city telling them they had 10 days to remove their “dangerous” animal from the city limits.  Those dog owners appealed the order to remove their dogs at last night’s meeting.

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Council voted to table indefinitely a decision on what action it should take to allow time to get a better reading on the desires of the community as a whole.

Read more at Blessthebullys.com…

Aberdeen SD – Council Looks To Re-Open Discussions On Breed Bans

In March of 2011 StopBSL reported Aberdeen Council passed a breed-neutral ordinance after six-amendments were offered, including two that would have made the ordinance breed-specific.  The approved ordinance restricts dangerous dogs, but rather than by breed, individual dogs earn the title based on their behavior.

In October of the same year, discussion again leaned heavily toward amending the new ordinance to ‘scrutinize’ specific breeds more than others.
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